The IOCDF is not affiliated with any of the following studies, although we ensure that all research studies listed on this page have been reviewed and approved by an Internal Review Board (IRB). We do our best to keep this list up-to-date, but please contact the research institutions directly to confirm the status of any studies you are interested in. If you are an organization interested in posting a research study below, please click here.

Online/Phone/Mail

Multiple Sites

California

Connecticut

Florida

Illinois

Maryland

Massachusetts

Michigan

Minnesota

New York

North Dakota

Ohio

Pennsylvania

Rhode Island

Texas

Wisconsin

Canada

Germany

United Kingdom


Do you experience obsessive-compulsive difficulties?

On behalf of the Lancaster University Clinical Psychology Doctorate programme, I am looking for participants to take part in a study examining the role of emotions in obsessive-compulsive experiences. Participation involves completing an online questionnaire; this is likely to take around 20 minutes to complete.

The study aims to develop a better understanding of the emotional factors that underlie individual experiences of obsessions and compulsions. An increased understanding of such experiences may inform the development of more effective support for people with difficulties of this nature. Further information about the aims of the study will be provided once you have completed the questionnaire.

Before deciding to take part you will have the opportunity to read some more detailed information about the study and to check that you meet the criteria necessary to participate. You will then be asked to consent to taking part. Once you have given your consent the survey will begin and you will be asked to complete an online questionnaire; this will ask you to think about different emotions and obsessive-compulsive experiences. Your participation in the study will remain anonymous. You will only be able to complete this questionnaire once.

If you are thinking of taking part in this study, and would like to contact the researcher for any reason, please email l.rathbone@lancaster.ac.uk or telephone +441542 594083.

Please follow this link for more information and to take part in the study: http://bit.ly/ocdsurvey
**Please note you will need the following password to log-in: survey

Posted November 9, 2016


Neurocircuitry of OCD: Effects of Modulation, Project STIM – Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) in OCD

Researchers at Butler Hospital and the Alpert Medical School of Brown University are conducting a research study to learn more about the effects of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in people with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD). tDCS, a non-invasive form of brain stimulation, delivers a weak electrical current to the brain via electrodes placed on the head. Project STIM is testing whether this type of brain stimulation affects parts of the brain thought to be involved in OCD, and its effects on OCD symptoms.

If you are between the ages of 18 and 65 and have symptoms of OCD, you may be eligible to participate. The study involves a diagnostic evaluation, 10 sessions of tDCS with the option for an additional 10 sessions, study assessments, and two MRI scans over the course of 9-11 weeks. There is no cost to participate and participants will be compensated for their time.

To learn more, please contact our research team at (401) 455-6366.

Posted: November 8, 2016


Research Opportunity in Southeastern Wisconsin: Test App on a Smartphone for Adult OCD Sufferers

Principal Investigators: Dr. Bradley Riemann, PhD and Dr. Nader Amir, PhD

Rogers Behavioral Health is currently recruiting individuals (aged 18-65) with OCD symptoms to participate in testing a computer-based treatment program. The treatment, delivered on a smartphone in a controlled setting, is aimed at reducing the anxiety associated with the disorder.
After participants complete a clinical interview, researchers will individualize the program to specifically target their OCD symptoms. Study details:

  • Participants cannot be currently enrolled in treatment, but can be medicated for OCD.
  • Nine visits, twice a week for approximately 4 weeks, in our Brown Deer or Oconomowoc, WI locations
  • Participants will receive compensation up to $250

If interested please contact us at:
researchstudies@rogershospital.org
414-865-2600
rogershospital.org/research


Online Survey about Childhood Experiences and OCD

If you are an adult (age >18) and suffer from the symptoms of OCD you are invited to complete an online survey about your symptoms as well as certain childhood experiences that some people have. This study is being conducted by the Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology at Yeshiva University. If you consent to participate in this study you will complete a series of anonymous questionnaires that ask you questions about your childhood experiences and emotions. The survey should take approximately 45 minutes to complete. If you elect to participate you will have the option to be entered into a raffle for one of four $50 gift cards. To learn more about the study please follow the link below:

https://yeshiva.co1.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_bJHeDO4h3NzZzyR

Posted: November 8, 2016


Computerized Treatment for Body Dysmorphic Disorder

Are you very concerned about your appearance? Do you wish you could worry about those concerns less? We are testing a computerized treatment for body dysmorphic disorder, a disorder characterized by a severe preoccupation with a perceived flaw in one’s appearance. Participants are compensated for their participation. The study is completed entirely online and over the phone. Participants will be assigned to one of two computerized treatments for appearance concerns. One treatment will help participants to modify thoughts to manage appearance concerns and the second treatment will guide participants through relaxation techniques to help manage negative emotions. Each treatment involves eight 15-25-minute online sessions that will take place over 4 weeks (2 sessions per week). Throughout the study period, participants will be asked to fill out questionnaires in which they will answer questions about their mood and behaviors.

Call 571-758-3389 or email fsubddstudy@gmail.com for more information or click here to see if you qualify: https://fsu.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_39LXyZzYGk8GBj7

NOTE: You must be between the ages of 18 and 65 to participate.
FSU IRB contact information: (850) 644-8633

Posted: November 3, 2016


Do you suffer from severe body image issues?

We are currently seeking volunteers for a research study using an experimental natural supplement for body dysmorphic disorder.

  • You must be between 18 and 64 years old.
  • You must think about body issues at least one hour per day.
  • Body issues cannot be related to weight.

If you are interested in participating, please complete this screening survey:

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/BodyDys

This study is being conducted by Dr. Jon Grant at the University of Chicago.

Posted: November 3, 2016


Stanford Hoarding Disorder Research Study

Enhancing Treatment of Hoarding Disorder with Personalized In-home Sorting and Decluttering Practice

Purpose: To understand if personalized in home sorting and decluttering practice can help enhance treatment of hoarding symptoms

Do you have difficulty with clutter?
Feeling overwhelmed and needing help?
Are you 18-65 years old?
Not taking medications or willing to work with your primary doctor for a trial off your medications?

You may be eligible to receive evidenced-based treatment. There is no cost to participate.

Physician Investigator: Carolyn Rodriguez, M.D, Ph.D., Stanford Medical Center
https://med.stanford.edu/profiles/carolyn-rodriguez?tab=bio
Funding: National Institutes of Mental Health (NIMH)
Stanford IRB# 34622
NCT02843308

For more information contact:
clutterhelp@stanford.edu
650-723-4095
https://rodriguezlab.stanford.edu

Participant’s rights questions, contact 1-866-680-2906.

Posted: November 1, 2016


Scrupulosity (or religious obsessions) and OCD

Are you age 18–21? Do you have OR have you had OCD symptoms? And do you have OR have you had religious obsessions? Please think about being in this research study. This study will look at religious obsessions for teens with OCD symptoms, and how this has touched their faith life. It will take 15 minutes to answer some questions. Your answers will be completely anonymous.

If you are age 18–21, you can look at the information on the link below. Then you can decide if you want to participate. If you have any questions you can contact the research, Nora B. Krause, LCSW, at nkrause@vols.utk.edu. To find out more just click on the internet link below if you are looking at this on your computer. You can also enter this website address into your computer browser:

https://utk.co1.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_8v8m0gauFlu51gV

Posted: September 7, 2016


Couple/Family Intervention Study for Anxiety Disorders

If you have a primary diagnosis of OCD and are living with a spouse/committed partner or with parent(s), you may be eligible for a treatment study at the Penn Anxiety Program. The program will provide 12 sessions of individual or group cognitive-behavioral therapy along with experimental couple/family therapy without charge. Couples/families will be randomly assigned to brief (1) or more extensive (up to 12 sessions) experimental couple or family sessions designed to assist them in working together to overcome the patient’s anxiety disorder. Patients already in individual or group CBT elsewhere are also eligible to participate with their therapist’s agreement.

Patients must be 18 to 70 years of age. Both patients and the committed partners, spouses, or parents with whom they live must be willing to participate in the treatment and to complete assessment procedures before treatment and at monthly intervals for 10 months thereafter. Some compensation is provided for assessments.

For more information, please contact:
Penn Anxiety Program
Phone: (215) 898-7376
E-mail: sas-anxietytreatment@sas.upenn.edu
Web site: https://sites.sas.upenn.edu/pennanxietyprogram/

Posted: August 9, 2016


SDSU Treatment Study for Pediatric OCD

Researchers: Jennie Kuckertz, MS and Nader Amir, PhD

The Center for Understanding and Treating Anxiety at San Diego State University is examining treatment of obsessive compulsive disorder in children ages 8-12. Eligible families will participate in exposure and response prevention treatment as well as a novel computerized intervention as part of a research study funded by the National Institute of Mental Health. Participants will also complete an EEG and receive a picture of their brain activity!

If you are interested in participating in this study, or would like more information, please contact us:

Phone: (619) 229-3740
Email: SDSU.CUTA@gmail.com
Website: https://nas.psy.sdsu.edu/

Posted: August 9, 2016


Are you parenting a child experiencing symptoms of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder?

My name is Lauren Luckert and I am a doctoral student in Fordham University’s School Psychology Program. I am currently seeking parents/guardians of children (ages 8-17) who have been diagnosed with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD), or who are experiencing symptoms consistent with an OCD diagnosis, to participate in my research study. The study will look at what it means to parent a child with obsessive-compulsive symptoms and the impact these symptoms have on the parent and family. The results will hopefully provide insight into more effective ways to help not only children who suffer from obsessive-compulsive symptoms, but their parents and families as well. Participation in the study requires the completion of an anonymous survey that takes approximately 30 minutes to complete and will ask questions regarding your child’s symptoms, your own feelings/reactions towards parenting your child, and how your family functions while having a member experiencing obsessive-compulsive symptoms.

For each completed survey, I will be donating $1 to the International OCD Foundation whose mission is to help all individuals with OCD and related disorders to live full and productive lives by increasing access to effective treatment, ending the stigma associated with mental health issues, and fostering a community for those affected by OCD and the professionals who treat them.

Your participation in this study is greatly appreciated and will provide invaluable information that may help the many individuals and families who live with OCD. In addition, participants will be given the option to receive a summary of the findings from the study. Thank you for your time and assistance!

Use the following link to access the survey: http://goo.gl/forms/X4mLTGIq0IHG4i273

Posted: June 16, 2016


Evaluation of the self-help manual “myMCT” (my metacognitive training, latest edition) for obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD)

Study participation is free of charge and anonymous

We would like to invite you to a treatment study that aims to reduce obsessive and depressive thoughts as well as compulsive behavior: http://ww3.unipark.de/uc/myMCT2016/

We are clinical researchers from the University Medical Center in Hamburg (Germany). For years, we have been conducting research on psychological factors underlying obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). In the present study, we are conducting an online study examining the effectiveness of the latest version of the self-help manual “myMCT” (my metacognitive training).

Conditions for participation:

  1. To participate in the study it is necessary that you have symptoms of obsessivecompulsive disorder (OCD) or are diagnosed with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD).
  2. You should not take part in this study if you have a bipolar disorder or a psychosis. Also you should not take part if you have suicidal ideation.
  3. If you agree to participate in the study, you will be asked to take part in a pre survey in written form via the internet – which you have to complete first – and after six weeks to take part in a similar post survey. Both surveys will take approximately 20 minutes to complete.
  4. If you agree to participate in the study, we will ask you to leave your email address so that we are able to send you the self-help manual.

The study
You will be assigned to one of two conditions after you have filled out the anonymous online survey on your current symptom. You will either be assigned to a “treatment group” and receive the “myMCT” self-help manual immediately or you will be assigned to the “waitlist group” and receive the manual after a period of six weeks. Six weeks after you complete the first survey, you will be invited to participate in the post survey. After participating in the post survey the waitlist group will be sent the self-help manual. Each participant will thus eventually receive the self-help manual free of charge as well as another manual to express our gratitude for participation. As it is an ongoing study, please do not pass on the manual to others.

To participate, please use the following link: http://ww3.unipark.de/uc/myMCT2016/

Study participation is free of charge and anonymous. The terms for participation will be repeated in more detail on the website of the survey. In case of questions please do not hesitate to contact us via email: sarahcatherine.murray@stu.uni-kiel.de

Best regards, Sarah Murray & Steffen Moritz

Prof. Dr. Steffen Moritz
University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf
Center for Psychosocial Medicine
Clinical Neuropsychology
Martinistr. 52, 20246 Hamburg (Germany)

Posted: June 16, 2016


Medication-Assisted Therapy for Treatment of Pediatric OCD

Research to Help Children with Refractory OCD

Do you have a child between the ages of 7 and 17 with OCD or symptoms of OCD? Is your child free of medication or on a stable dose of medication with no planned changes? Has your child failed to improve with previous therapy? If so, your child may be eligible for a research study available through the UCLA Childhood OCD, Anxiety and Tic Disorders Program!
Through a research grant from the International OCD Foundation, we are conducting research comparing whether an existing medication (memantine) improves the benefits of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) relative to a placebo pill.
Participation involves:

  • Initial visit to UCLA to assess eligibility and OCD severity
  • A one-time blood draw
  • MRI brain scans (before and after)
  • 8 weeks of concurrent CBT through the UCLA Pediatric OCD, Anxiety and Tic Disorders Clinic
  • 3-month follow up
  • Payment of up to $100

Please contact 310-794-9201 or email (enurmi@ucla.edu) for more information.

Posted: June 16, 2016


Adults with Appearance Concerns Needed for Research Study

The Massachusetts General Hospital is seeking men and women who are very worried about how they look to participate in a research study. We are doing this research study to examine the effect of a nasal spray containing the hormone, oxytocin, on a number of psychiatric measures and social perception tasks (tasks that evaluate how people relate to others). Women must not be pregnant and must be taking oral contraception. If you are eligible, participation involves a clinical interview, questionnaires, use of two nasal sprays containing oxytocin and placebo, and computerized tasks. Participation includes three brief visits to MGH and up to $120 compensation. For more information: 877-4MGH-BDD or bdd@partners.org.

Updated: November 3, 2016


Adults with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Needed for Research Study

The Massachusetts General Hospital is seeking men and women who have obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). OCD is a psychiatric illness characterized by persistent and intrusive obsessions and/or repetitive, time-consuming compulsions. We are doing this research study to examine the effect of a nasal spray containing the hormone, oxytocin, on a number of psychiatric measures and social perception tasks (tasks that evaluate how people relate to others). Women must not be pregnant and must be taking oral contraception. If you are eligible, participation involves a clinical interview, questionnaires, use of two nasal sprays containing oxytocin and placebo, and computerized tasks. Participation includes three brief visits to MGH and up to $120 compensation. For more information: 877-4MGH-BDD or bdd@partners.org.

Updated: November 3, 2016


Parents of Adolescent Children with Mental Illness: A Qualitative Exploration of the Lived Experience

Hello!
My name is Lindsay Yates and I am a Counseling Psychology doctoral candidate in the Counseling Psychology and Community Services department at the University of North Dakota. I am doing research on the experience of parents of adolescent children diagnosed with severe and persistent mental illness under the supervision of Doctor Cindy Juntunen.

I am specifically recruiting English-speaking custodial parents (18 years of age or older) of an adolescent (aged 13 to 17 years old) diagnosed with a severe and persistent mental illness, of any gender and ethnic background to participate in an interview that will take approximately 60 minutes. Individuals are invited to participate in an in-person interview about their experiences. Phone and Skype interviews may be set up instead of in-person interviews if this relieves any additional stress for participants. This research has been approved by the Institutional Review Board at the University of North Dakota.

For the purposes of this research, severe and persistent mental illness is defined as any diagnosis in the following categories, as defined and outlined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders – Fifth Edition (DSM-V; APA, 2013):

  • Schizophrenia Spectrum and Other Psychotic Disorders
  • Bipolar and Related Disorders
  • Depressive Disorders
  • Anxiety Disorders
  • Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders
  • Trauma- and Stress-Related Disorders
  • Dissociative Disorders
  • Somatic Symptom and Related Disorders
  • Feeding and Eating Disorders
  • Disruptive, Impulse-Control, and Conduct Disorders.

-Your child must have one diagnosis that fits into one of the above categories.
-Your child must have been diagnosed at least 6 months ago.
-Your child must have been diagnosed by a medical or mental health provider (e.g., general practitioner, psychologist, psychiatrist, social worker, counselor, nurse practitioner, physician’s assistant, or other related providers).
-Your child must currently be receiving mental health services.

Those interested in participating should email the principal investigator (Lindsay.Yates@und.edu) and provide your phone number. The principal investigator will contact you, after ensuring you meet participation requirements, to set up a convenient date and time to complete an interview. You are not obligated to participate in this research and if you do choose to participate, you may terminate your participation at any time without consequence.

Please email me if you are interested in participating: Lindsay.yates@und.edu

Thank you so much! P.S. Feel free to forward the link to others who might be interested!

Lindsay Yates, MS
Dept.: Counseling Psychology and Community Services
Position: Doctoral Student
University of North Dakota
Email: Lindsay.yates@und.edu

Cindy Juntunen, PhD
Dept.: Counseling Psychology and Community Services
Position: Supervising Professor
University of North Dakota
Email: Cindy.juntunen@und.edu
Phone: (701)777-3740

Posted: April 8, 2016


Effect of Shame on Memory in Adults with OCD

Study Participants Sought: Adults Diagnosed with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder
Please contact Martina Bonolis at mab2322@tc.columbia.edu if you would be interesting in participating in an hour-long online survey looking at the relationship between anxiety and memory. Identities are kept strictly confidential. Participants will be entered in a raffle to win a $200 amazon gift card. IRB #16-224

Posted March 29, 2016


Families with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder are invited to help scientists learn more about the causes of OCD

A team of investigators at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine has been studying the occurrence of OCD in families. We are now investigating genetic factors, which may increase the susceptibility to OCD. Recent advances in molecular biology and statistical genetics make it possible to identify and describe specific genes that may cause complex diseases such as OCD. We are seeking help from families with OCD to help to conduct these studies.

YOU CAN HELP!!
Families with 2 or more relatives with OCD are invited to participate in the study. Participants will be given a confidential interview about their medical and psychiatric history and will be asked to provide a small sample of blood. Participants do not need to travel. Participants will be monetarily compensated. Confidentiality of all information is assured.

YOUR HELP COUNTS!!
Each participant’s help is vital and it DOES make a difference. Families may be referred by a clinician, or may contact us.

To learn more about the study, please contact:
Jack Samuels, PhD, Associate Professor, E-MAIL: jacks@jhmi.edu
The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
Department of Psychiatry 550 N. Broadway, Room 902, Baltimore, MD 21205

Visit us at:
http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/psychiatry/specialty_areas/obsessive_compulsive_disorder

Or at: http://goo.gl/tjoIdO

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Gerald Nestadt, MD, MPH

Posted: March 17, 2016


Seeking Participants for Research on Ownership and Decision-Making

Research conducted at the University of British Columbia

We are currently running a study that examines how people make decisions about their possessions. We are looking for English speaking adults between 19 and 75 years old. There are no requirements concerning one’s level of household clutter. You will be asked to talk about your saving habits with a researcher on the phone, make decisions about household objects (online), and complete several questionnaires (online).

Compensation: $8-$20

For more information, please contact us by phone at (604) 822-8025 or by email at ubcdmstudy@gmail.com.

Posted: February 4, 2016


Understanding How Ketamine Brings About Rapid Improvement in OCD

NCT02624596, IRB-34622
PI: Carolyn Rodriguez, M.D., Ph.D.

The Stanford Translational OCD Research Program is looking for adults, 18-55 years old, with OCD, to take part in a study providing these possible benefits:

  • Free Diagnostic Evaluation
  • Free Scan of Your Brain and Picture
  • Free Test of Your Memory and Attention
  • Compensation of $400 after study completion
  • Your choice of free OCD psychotherapy or pharmacology after study completion

Purpose
To understand how a new drug brings about rapid improvement in OCD symptoms

Contact
(650) 723-4095
ocdresearch@stanford.edu

Posted: February 3, 2016


Sexual Orientation Concerns in Therapy

My name is Alexandria Luxon and I am a second-year graduate student at Towson University. My Master’s thesis is on the topic of therapists’/graduate students’ knowledge of LGB issues. The survey has been approved by Towson University’s Institutional Review Board and lasts approximately 20-30 minutes. There is also an opportunity, at the conclusion of the survey, to enter your name into a raffle drawing for a $100 gift card to Amazon.com. I would greatly appreciate it if you would be willing to take the time to complete this survey.

The link to my survey is available below. If have any questions or concerns, please do not hesitate to contact myself or the Institutional Review Board Chairperson, Dr. Debi Gartland, Office of University Research Services, 8000 York Road, Towson University, Towson, Maryland 21252; phone (410) 704-2236.

Sincere thanks for your time and assistance.
Alexandria M. Luxon
Clinical Psychology, MA Candidate
Towson University, 2016

Link to Survey: https://towsonpsychology.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_0uk4sGtOPrp9MFf

Posted: February 1, 2016


Do you or your child suffer from obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD)?

The Department of Psychology at Texas A&M University is conducting an online psychology study that aims to better understand OCD and related disorders. If you are an adult who has OCD (or believes you have OCD), you can participate in the current study. Or, if you have a child or adolescent who has OCD and is between the ages of 7-17, your child can participate in the study. Parents must be present in order to provide permission for their child to participate, and parents will be asked to fill out several questionnaires along with their children.

Once you click the link, you will read a brief description of the study and be provided contact information for the researchers should you have any questions, and then be assessed for eligibility. Persons who are addicted to alcohol or drugs, have been diagnosed with a psychotic disorder (e.g., schizophrenia) or autism spectrum disorder, or have certain neurological disorders will be asked to refrain from participating.

If you meet the criteria for this study, you can take part on your computer/tablet/or smartphone at home! Taking part in the study involves completing a battery of questionnaires on your electronic device. It should take between 45 minutes to 1 hour to complete. Once you have completed the study, you can enter your contact information to be entered into a lottery drawing for a $25 gift card to Amazon.com. A total of 10 gift cards will be awarded, and your odds of winning depend on the number of participants who enter the lottery.

If you are interested in taking part, click on this link: https://agrilife.az1.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_cHfpksWFOL0HLEN

If you have questions, please email davidhoughton@tamu.edu

TAMU IRB #2015-0775D Approved: 01/15/2016 Expiration Date: 01/15/2017

Posted: January 17, 2016


iCBT Internet Based Treatment for OCD (IRB #6837)

This study is for New York and New Jersey state residents who are having trouble with their OCD symptoms and would be interested in participating in a research study to test the effectiveness of a ten week therapist-supported online treatment.

Online treatment will be provided at no cost. The goal of this study is to help participants improve the severity of their OCD through online cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), which includes evidence -based exposure and response prevention (EX/RP) techniques. One in-person evaluation at the Columbia University Medical Center is required for the program, and the rest of the treatment will be completed from the convenience of your own computer. Participants will have 10 weeks to complete 10 online treatment modules, guided by a study therapist, who will be available to them every step of the way via the online treatment platform. The online therapy modules will help you learn about your OCD and guide you through a treatment program that is tailored to fit your needs.

For more information about participating, please call Olivia Pascucci at (646) 774-8064, or visit our website at www.columbiapsychiatry.org/ocd.

Posted: November 2, 2015


Control and Reward Circuits in OCD (IRB #7000)

  • Are you between the ages of 18 – 55?
  • Do you have bothersome OCD symptoms?
  • Are you not taking any psychiatric medications?
  • Are you interested in receiving no-cost therapy treatment that may improve your symptoms?

If you answered “yes” to all four questions, you may be eligible for treatment as part of our research study “Control and Reward Circuits in OCD.” Eligible participants will be asked questions about their symptoms, perform tasks on a computer, and receive 17 sessions of cognitive behavioral therapy consisting of Exposure and Ritual Prevention (EX/RP). You will receive a brain scan using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) both before and after therapy. The purpose of this study is to assess whether therapy treatment with EX/RP changes the brain.

For more information about participating, please call Olivia Pascucci at (646) 774-8064, or visit our website at www.columbiapsychiatry.org/ocd.

Posted: November 2, 2015


Does your child or teen have OCD?

If he or she is 8-17 years old and not taking psychiatric medication, he or she may be eligible for a sertraline treatment and MRI study. Study participants will be compensated.

For more information, please contact:

  • The research coordinator, Elizabeth, at (612) 625-1632 or harr1317@umn.edu, or
  • The Principal Investigator, Dr. Gail Bernstein, at (612) 273-9721 or berns001@umn.edu.

Visit our website at www.youthocdstudy.org for more information.


How much do you care? Self-compassion in Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

Help us as we examine the relationships between self-compassion and values in OCD.

http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/2ZVJVNC

Help us as we examine the relationships between self-compassion, mood, and response styles in OCD.

http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/PYHKNM2

Click on either link (or enter it into your web browser) to do the survey. If you are over 18 years of age and have Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, you may participate.

Participation is completely anonymous. Your information will never be sold or shared and is only for research purposes.


Do you suffer from obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) or generalized anxiety disorder (GAD)?

Do you reside in the USA?

The Department of Psychology at New York University is looking for paid participants in an online psychology study that aims to better understand psychiatric disorders, in particular OCD and Anxiety. Unlike most studies, it does not matter if you also suffer from one or more other psychiatric disorders, so long as you currently have symptomatic OCD or GAD. Prior to taking part in the study, you must speak with a trained clinician over the telephone. They will assess your eligibility for this study by asking you some questions that relate to mental health. You must have a US telephone number in order to take part.

If you meet the criteria for this study, you can take part on your computer at home! Taking part in the study involves completing a computerized battery of tests and questionnaires on your personal computer. It should take approximately 2 hours to complete and you will be paid $20 for taking part, in addition to a small bonus for performance on one of the computerized tasks, which will range between 0-$1.

If you are interested in taking part, click this link.

If you have questions, please email dimensionalpsychiatry@gmail.com.

Posted: September 22, 2015


Associated Features of Hoarding Disorder, OCD, and other anxiety disorders

Dr. Sanjaya Saxena and colleagues in the UCSD Department of Psychiatry are conducting a research study to find out more about associated features of compulsive hoarding, such as perfectionism, indecision, procrastination, disorganization, and thought disorder. You may qualify as a participate in this study if you have compulsive hoarding, or you may qualify as a participant with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) or another anxiety disorder. There will be approximately 100 participants in this study. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether perfectionism, indecision, procrastination, disorganization, and thought disorder are specifically linked to compulsive hoarding, and not just all anxiety disorders in general.

If you agree to be in this study, You will be asked to answer questions related to psychiatric symptoms, particularly compulsive hoarding symptoms and anxiety related symptoms, that you may have experienced. If you are eligible for the study, you will be asked to complete some questionnaires and symptom rating scales.

Your participation will take a total of approximately four hours, and you will be expected to come in once only.

Visit out website at http://psychiatry.ucsd.edu/research/obsessive-compulsive-disorders-program or contact Jennifer Sumner at (858) 246-1872 or ucsdocdresearch@gmail.com for more information.

Posted: September 18, 2015


Shame and Self-Consciousness Study

The Bio-Behavioral Institute in Great Neck, NY is conducting a study looking at the role of shame, self-consciousness, and disgust in individuals with OCD, BDD, and non-clinical controls. The study involves answering a few short online measures that will take between 20 minutes to a half hour to complete. The study is completely confidential. To begin, simply click on the following link www.surveymonkey.com/s/5DNXWWR. Thank you for your time.

Updated: September 10, 2015


Self-Help Treatment Group for Individuals with Hoarding Disorder

Do you have so many items saved up that they get in the way?
Do you have difficulty throwing things away?

If you are over the age of 18 you may be eligible to participate in a self-help group treatment as part of a research study.

Participants will receive a free comprehensive evaluation and assessment prior to starting the treatment program. The treatment will consist of 13 sessions moderated by a trained facilitator. There will be no cost associated with the treatment.

To learn more about this project please contact The Program for Anxiety, Stress and OCD (PASO) at:

(305) 284-5394

This research is being conducted under the direction of Kiara Timpano, PhD, University of Miami, Department of Psychology.

Posted: September 10, 2015


Muscle Dysmorphia and BDD

(PI: Aaron J. Blashill, Ph.D.)
1-877-4MGH-BDD
BDD@PARTNERS.ORG
www.mghocd.org/clinical-services/bdd/

This study is examining similarities and differences between body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), and a subtype of BDD called muscle dysmorphia, among men age 18 and older. Muscle dysmorphia involves an excessive preoccupation with thoughts that one’s body is not sufficiently lean and muscular, and frequently involves excessive weightlifting. We are interested in recruiting both men with muscle dysmorphia and those with non-muscle focused appearance concerns. This one-time study visit is at the MGH main campus, and will last for roughly 2 hours, and consist of an interview with a clinician and filling out questionnaires. You will be reimbursed $50.00 for the completion of the study visit.

Posted: December 5, 2014


Obsessive Compulsive Disorder and Parenting Styles

My name is Hilmar von Strunck and I am in the process of completing my dissertation for a Ph.D. in Psychology and I would appreciate your help. I would be forever grateful if you would participate in the survey found here: https://www.esurveycreator.com/s/18ec96f

This survey is about obsessive compulsive disorder and parenting styles.

Collecting these data is essential to complete my dissertation and finish my studies.

Thank you so very much for your help in my research project. Please do not hesitate to contact me at any time at: hilmar.vonstrunck@waldenu.edu

Sincerely yours,

Hilmar von Strunck, PhD Candidate


Collaborative Genomics Study of Tourette’s Disorder

The Mount Sinai Obsessive Compulsive and Related Disorders Program is recruiting subjects with a past or current diagnosis of OCD, Tourette Disorder, or chronic tic disorder for a genetic study that will examine the inheritance patterns and genetic contributions to these disorders. Affected and unaffected biological family members may also be eligible to participate. The study includes the completion of a medical history questionnaire and a blood draw, and will take one to three hours. Those who live outside the New York City metro area may participate by completing assessments via telephone and a blood draw at a convenient site. Participants will be reimbursed $50 upon completion, and travel costs up to $15 can be covered. For those interested in participating or learning more, contact Dr. Dorothy Grice or Shannon Gair at (212) 659-1675, or Shannon.Gair@mssm.edu.

Posted: June 6, 2014


Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) in Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD): Mechanisms and biomarkers

PI: Joan Camprodon, MD, PhD, MPH

We are looking for adults with OCD between the ages of 18 and 65 in order to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of TMS in treating OCD. TMS is a noninvasive method in which a magnetic “coil” is placed near an individual’s head and delivers small electrical currents in the brain, stimulating brain cells that may relieve OCD symptoms. Research has demonstrated this treatment is effective in treating depression, and we would like to expand this research to OCD. For further information about this research, please contact us at (866) 6MGH-OCD or email OCDclinic@mgh.harvard.edu.

Updated: November 3, 2016


Adults with Appearance Concerns Needed for Oxytocin Biomarker Research Study

PI: Sabine Wilhelm, PhD
877-4MGH-BDD
bdd@partners.org

The Massachusetts General Hospital is seeking men and women who are very worried about how they look to participate in a research study. We are doing this research study to examine the relationship between oxytocin levels in the blood and performance on a number of psychiatric measures, including social perception tasks (tasks that evaluate how people relate to others). If you are eligible, participation involves blood draws, a clinical interview, questionnaires, and computerized tasks. Women must be having regular menstrual cycles and not taking oral contraception. Participation includes two brief visits to MGH and up to $100 compensation. For more information please contact us at 877-4MGH-BDD or bdd@partners.org.

Updated: November 3, 2016


Trial to evaluate the efficacy of dTMS (deep transcranial magnetic stimulation) for OCD?

DO YOU SUFFER FROM OCD?

We are looking for patients who suffer from Obsessive Compulsive Disorder aged 22-68 years to participate in a study using transcranial magnetic stimulation. This study may help researchers develop ways to effectively and non-invasively treat OCD. Participants will be evaluated by a licensed psychiatrist and qualified study coordinator. There is no cost to participate and participants will be compensated.

Principal Investigator: Eric Hollander, MD
Taking place at: Spectrum Neuroscience and Treatment Institute

If interested, please contact the study coordinator at (646) 351-0212 or abrandolini@spectrumneuroscience.org

Posted: August 4, 2015


Have you been diagnosed with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD)?

YOU ARE NOT ALONE!

If you have OCD and are 18 or older…

I am conducting a study to help understand what factors contribute to chronic obsessions and compulsions.  This study will consist of an online survey that will take 15 minutes. The results are intended to improve treatment for individuals with OCD. This study is being conducted as part of my dissertation. To access the survey, please go to www.surveymonkey.com/r/OCDJB.

Please contact the following individuals with any concerns:

Researcher: Jennifer Blair, jblair@my.adler.edu, 201-452-5778
Dissertation Chair: Dr. Peter Ji, pji@adler.edu, 312-662-4354
IRB Co-Chair: Dr. Lyuba Bobova, lbobova@adler.edu, 312-662-4366

If you are experiencing any emotional distress you are encouraged to visit https://therapists.psychologytoday.com to find a trained mental health professional in your area.

Posted: August 5, 2015


Stepped Care Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Pediatric OCD

The University of South Florida is conducting a research study on Stepped Care Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for children with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD). In Stepped Care Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (SC-CBT), children will receive a full course of parent-led, therapist-guided treatment for OCD. The goal is to see if therapy can be done in fewer visits to our clinic. If your child qualifies for this study, there is a 2 out of 3 chance he or she will receive SC-CBT, and a 1 out of 3 chance of receiving standard CBT (12 sessions with a therapist in our clinic). Participation can last up to 6 months, please call for details. All therapy sessions will be provided at no cost to you. Your child would participate in assessments at three to four different times throughout the study. All sessions would take place at the Rothman Center for Pediatric Neuropsychiatry in St. Petersburg, Florida.

TO BE IN THE STUDY, your child must complete an assessment to determine eligibility and be between the ages of 8-17.

If you are interested in participating or would like more information, please call Nicole McBride, study coordinator at: 727-767-2387.
University of South Florida IRB #19377

Posted: June 29, 2015


Does your child have a problem with pulling his/her hair?

We are currently seeking volunteers for a 13-week study using an experimental supplement for hair pulling. The study will involve 8 visits in our office in Chicago. Participants must be between 10 and 65 years old. If interested, please contact Sarah Redden at (773) 702-9066 or sredden@uchicago.edu, University of Chicago, Department of Psychiatry, Addictive, Compulsive, and Impulsive Disorders Research Program.

Dr. Jon Grant is directing this study at the University of Chicago.

Updated: August 9, 2016


Elucidating the Neural Circuitry of OCD to Improve Real-Life Experiences (ENCORE)

Do you have symptoms of OCD?

Researchers at UPMC are conducting functional brain imaging studies in individuals experiencing symptoms of OCD.

Participants will have a lifetime psychiatric evaluation and complete various tasks while having an fMRI (Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging) scan. The fMRI and other tasks are non-invasive procedures. This study does not involve medication or treatment.

If you are between the ages of 18 and 35 and have symptoms of OCD, you may be eligible to participants. Participants will be compensated for each aspect of the study.

For more information or to learn if you qualify, call ENCORE Study at (412) 256-8693. UPMC | University of Pittsburgh Medical Center.

Posted: June 25, 2015


Online Survey of Beliefs about OCD Treatment

Please help us with a research survey about OCD treatment and enter a raffle for a $50 gift card!

I am a graduate student working toward my doctorate in Clinical Psychology at Yeshiva University, and I am collaborating on a research project about OCD. I am writing to ask if anyone (adults age >18) would be interested in participating in an online survey about your beliefs about treatments that exist for OCD. The survey should take around 40 minutes to complete. The study was reviewed and approved by the Institutional Review Board at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine.

If you elect to participate you will be entered into a raffle for a $50 gift card! We are now about a quarter-way done with our data collection, and have already awarded one $50 gift card to a participant. However, we still have three remaining gift cards to give out, so please consider filling out our survey. We really appreciate your help!

To learn more about the study please follow the link below:

https://yeshiva.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_6GxEWgbMJcx1ZaJ

Thank you for participating!


Help Reduce OCD Stigma!

The purpose of this study is to obtain a better understanding of the types of obsessions individuals with OCD experience.  While the way in which OCD can present for an individual and across individuals often varies greatly, social media tends to portray OCD in a more limited manner (i.e. contamination, checking, symmetry presentations).  Research has also found mental health professionals are often unaware of the broad range of ways that OCD can present.

Our hope is to gather a more comprehensive understanding of the types of obsessions and the associated levels of stigma that may be experienced by different OCD presentations among individuals with OCD.  We hope that doing so will provide a strong foundation for future work that will focus on increasing awareness regarding OCD and decrease stigma associated with OCD.

Your participation would be extremely helpful and very much appreciated.  In case you are interested, below is the link to the on-line study questionnaire.

https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/studyOCD

Thank you for your consideration.

Sincerely,
Chad Wetterneck, PhD and Bradley Riemann, PhD

Posted: June 10, 2015


Do you have Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD)?

  • Do you have UNWANTED THOUGHTS that are hard to control?
  • Do you have WORRIES or DOUBTS that WON’T GO AWAY?
  • Do you have to DO things OVER & OVER again?

If so and you are 18-65 years old, live within driving distance of Boston, and meet further study qualifications, you may be eligible to participate in one of our two experimental therapy studies at Massachusetts General Hospital and will receive the following at no-cost:

  • Diagnostic evaluation
  • Study treatment (with behavioral therapy or transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS))

The study will last between 20 and 30 weeks. Compensation provided.

These studies aim to test the effectiveness of two new treatments for OCD, and to help us understand what changes in the brain during these treatments. For further information about this research, please contact us at (866) 6MGH-OCD or email OCDclinic@mgh.harvard.edu.

Updated: November 3, 2016


Deep Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (DTMS) for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD)

GCO#14-1390: A Prospective, Double Blind, Randomized, Controlled Study to Evaluate the Safety and Efficacy of the Deep Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (DTMS) for the treatment of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

Researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai are recruiting for a multi-center clinical trial of HAC-coil Deep Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (DTMS) as a treatment for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD).

You may be eligible to participate in this study if you:

  • Are 22-68 years old
  • Have been diagnosed with OCD
  • Have been on SSRI medication for at least 2 months and/or are receiving psychotherapy.

Participation in this research study consists of 33 visits, including psychiatric assessments and 29 DTMS sessions over 12 weeks. Subjects may be reimbursed for expenses incurred.

Contact: David Rosenthal, Icahn School of Medicine Department of Psychiatry, at 212-659-8803 or david.rosenthal@mssm.edu for more information.

PI: Wayne Goodman, MD
GCO#14-1390; MSSM IRB Approved through 9/22/15

Posted: April 27, 2015


Web-based Treatment for College Students with OCD

Are you experiencing symptoms of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD)? Are you currently enrolled in a college/university and are your OCD symptoms interfering with your life? Or, did you drop out of college or go on medical leave because of your OCD symptoms?

OCD is characterized by the following core symptoms:

  • Recurrent, intrusive, and distressing thoughts, urges, or images (obsessions)
  • Repetitive mental or behavioral acts that the individual feels driven to perform (compulsions) to prevent or reduce distress, or to prevent some dreaded event or situation

The Northwell Health OCD Center is conducting a research study of web-based therapy for OCD for college students struggling with these symptoms. The therapy provided is Exposure and Response Prevention (EX/RP) which has been found to be effective in significantly reducing OCD symptoms, with many patients able to maintain their gains after therapy has stopped. Participants will receive one-on-one web-based-EX/RP with a live doctoral level clinician specializing in OCD. Treatment will include 60-minute sessions twice weekly for 8 weeks. As this is a funded study, the therapy will be provided at no cost to participants.

Call (718) 470-5005 ext. 63688 or email ccervoni@northwell.edu and mention our Web-Based Treatment Study for OCD to schedule a confidential phone screening to determine if you are eligible to participate. To learn more about the Northwell Health OCD Center, visit our website: www.northwell.edu/ocdcenter.

Updated: March 24, 2016


OCD-CBT Study: Do you have Obsessive Compulsive Disorder?

The University of Michigan Department of Psychiatry is conducting a research study using Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) as a treatment for those diagnosed with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). If you are someone who struggles with OCD, you may be eligible. Volunteers for this study will receive a comprehensive diagnostic evaluation, 12 outpatient therapy sessions and 2 MRI scans. All study procedures are provided by our expert clinicians at no charge.

Participants will be compensated for their time.

Eligible participants are:

  • Male or female
  • 25-45 years old
  • Diagnosed with OCD
  • Able to tolerate small, enclosed spaces
  • No alcohol or substance abuse or dependence
  • Other eligibility criteria may apply.

If interested, please click here: OCD-CBT Study: How CBT Works in the Brain

(HUM#00091368)

Posted: March 20, 2015


OCD-CBT Study: Does your teenager have Obsessive Compulsive Disorder?

The University of Michigan Department of Psychiatry is conducting a research study using Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) as a treatment for those diagnosed with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). If you have a teenager son or daughter who struggles with OCD, they may be eligible. Your teen will undergo a comprehensive diagnostic evaluation and 2 MRI scans. They will also receive 12 outpatient therapy sessions provided at no charge to you.

Eligible participants are:

  • Male or female
  • 13-17 years old
  • Diagnosed with OCD
  • Able to tolerate small, enclosed spaces
  • No alcohol or substance abuse or dependence
  • Other eligibility criteria may apply.

Participants will be compensated for their time.

If interested, please click here: OCD-CBT Study: Does your teenager have Obsessive Compulsive Disorder?

(HUM#00091368)

Posted: March 20, 2015


Research Study on Investigational Treatment for Hoarding

The UCSD Obsessive-Compulsive Disorders (OCD) Program is looking for people who have problems with hoarding, saving, or clutter to take part in a study that is providing:

  • Diagnostic Evaluations
  • Brain Imaging Scans
  • 12 weeks medication treatment
  • and Neuropsychological Evaluation

You may be eligible if you:

  • Have no history of psychiatric disorder
  • Are in good physical health

Study Conducted by Sanjaya Saxena, M.D.
UCSD Obsessive-Compulsive Disorders Program
Department of Psychiatry
UCSD School of Medicine
For more information, please contact:
OCD Research Program (858) 246-1872 or ucsdocdresearch@gmail.com

Updated: September 22, 2015


Do you have Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder?

We are currently recruiting adults (ages 18-65) for a study examining the gut bacteria in individuals with OCD.

The study will involve:

  • A comprehensive assessment to determine eligibility
  • A three hour time commitment (with compensation)
  • Provide 2 biological samples
  • Optimal medical treatment for OCD

For more information, please contact Jasmine at 905-921-7644 turnaj@mcmaster.ca

We are located in Hamilton, ON (Canada)

Posted: January 21, 2015


Do you have OCD? Are you looking for behavior therapy?
Therapy Integrating Exposure and Stimulation (TIES) Study

TIES is a new study designed for individuals with OCD who are interested in behavior therapy. If you have been diagnosed with OCD and are between the ages of 18 and 65, you may be eligible to participate.

Researchers at Butler Hospital and affiliated with the Alpert Medical School of Brown University are investigating whether combining noninvasive brain stimulation with behavior therapy can help to improve outcomes. Exposure and response prevention (ERP) — a specific type of behavior therapy — is a first line treatment for OCD. TIES will test whether a form of noninvasive brain stimulation called transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), can help ERP work better.

Study participants will receive an 11 session program that includes behavior therapy combined with active or sham tDCS and compensation for time spent completing study assessments (up to $185 for full participation).

If you are interested in learning more about TIES, please visit www.butler.org/TIES or call (401) 455-6610.

Posted: December 18, 2014


Do you live with a relative with a diagnosed anxiety disorder or obsessive-compulsive disorder?

If you have lived with your relative for at least one year and are 18 years of age or older, you might be eligible to participate in an online research study. We are studying various thoughts and emotions among relatives of individuals with anxiety disorders.

You will be asked to complete a short interview and a series of questionnaires. This should take about 30 minutes in total.

For more information, please contact the study investigator, Lillian Reuman, at:

The UNC Anxiety and Stress Disorders Clinic
Chapel Hill, NC
919-843-3951
familyanxiety@unc.edu

Posted: November 5, 2014


Attitudes towards Mental Health Problems

You are being asked to participate in an investigation that is being conducted to study attitudes towards mental health problems.

In this research, you will be asked to read a short scenario and answer a series of questions about the person in the scenario. You will also be asked to provide some background information about yourself.  Please be assured that no identifying information such as your name will be asked for so your anonymity and confidentiality is assured.

It will take approximately 10 to 15 minutes of time to read and respond to the questionnaire. There are no perceived risks to participation. Your participation is completely voluntary.  You may discontinue your participation at any time if you decide that you no longer want to participate. It will not have any effects on you at Sacred Heart University. Completion of the survey will indicate you have consented to participate. Following the completion of the research, all participants will have the opportunity to learn about the results and the relevant psychological issues. The results of the study will be posted on the following website:

http://fairfieldocdgroup.freehostia.com/

Please understand that your participation is completely voluntary and that you are free to withdraw from the study at any time without penalty. If you have any questions during or after the experiment, please do not hesitate to ask one of the researchers, or you may contact Dr. Christina Taylor at (203) 371-7723/taylorc@sacredheart.edu. or Dr. Diane Sholomskas at (203) 776-2077/sholaj@aol.com. You may also contact the SHU Wellness and Counseling Center at the link below:

http://www.sacredheart.edu/officesservices/wellnesscenter/counseling/

If you agree to participate in this study, here is the browser link for participation:

https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/5JCN7PN

Posted: November 3, 2014


Extending Ketamine’s Effects in OCD with Exposure and Response Prevention (IRB# 6811)

This study investigates if a single dose of IV ketamine can rapidly improve OCD symptoms and whether these effect can be maintained with a condensed course of a type of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy called exposure and response prevention (EX/RP). You will be compensated for your time and travel. Participants must be between the ages of 18-55. For more information, please contact the study coordinator: Jordana Zwerling at (646)774-8118.

Posted: October 2, 2014


Want support for coming off medication for Obsessive Compulsive Disorder?

The Tapering OCD Pharmacotherapy Support (TOPS) Study

 

Sick of taking medication for Obsessive Compulsive Disorder?

You may be eligible to participate in a FREE research study for adults with (OCD) who want to stop taking serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs).  This study is being conducted by researchers at Butler Hospital who are affiliated with the Alpert Medical School of Brown University.

TOPS study participants will receive 14 weeks of medication management and one of two 22-week programs designed to support individuals who want to stop SRI medication.

Participants may be compensated up to $100 for their time in completing interviews and questionnaires during, at the end, and 6 months following treatment.

All study appointments are held on the Butler Hospital campus in Providence, RI.

If you are interested in participating in TOPS, please visit the following website for more information or call (401) 455-6243.

www.butler.org/tops

Posted: September 4, 2014


Are you married? Do you or your spouse have OCD?

If your answer is yes, then you may be eligible to participate in a paid study conducted by researchers at the University of Louisville.  Your responses may help therapists better understand how to help married couples in distress because of problems associated with OCD.  The payment for participating in this study is $25 ($50 per couple).  Your spouse will also have to complete a related questionnaire before you will receive compensation.  Click here for more information and to participate in the online paid survey.

Posted: July 24, 2014


Intravenous (IV) Ketamine in Treatment-Resistant OCD

This study aims to determine whether a single dose of intravenous (IV) ketamine can help reduce symptoms of treatment-resistant OCD.

Participants must be between the ages of 21 and 65 and must have failed at least two FDA approved medication trials (clomipramine or SSRIs such as Prozac or Zoloft) as well as a trial of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). The study will consist of two intravenous infusions—one of ketamine and another of the active control midazolam separated by two weeks. Psychiatric assessments will be performed before each infusion and several times after each infusion.

Participants will be compensated for their participation.

Participants will be allowed to continue FDA approved medications (clomipramine or SSRIs) and as needed benzodiazepines (such as Xanax or Valium) during the trial, but participants cannot be on unapproved medications for the duration of the trial.

Organization: Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

Principal Investigator: Wayne Goodman, MD

Eligibility Criteria:

      • Male or female patients, 21-65 years;
      • Women of childbearing potential must agree to use a medically accepted means of contraception for the duration of the study;
      • Primary diagnosis of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder as assessed by SCID-P, with symptoms for at least 1 year;
      • History of a failure to respond to at least two (2) adequate pharmacotherapy trials and CBT for OCD (see above for definition for adequate trials);
      • Moderate to severe, treatment-resistant OCD.
      • Subjects must be able to identify a family member, physician, or friend who will participate in the Treatment Contract and serve as an emergency contact.

Exclusion Criteria

        • Women who plan to become pregnant within the next six months, are pregnant or are breast-feeding;
        • Non-English speakers;
        • Any unstable medical condition;
        • Lifetime history of bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, mental retardation, or pervasive developmental disorders;
        • Current presence of psychotic or manic symptoms;
        • Drug or alcohol abuse within the preceding 6 months;
        • Lifetime abuse or dependence to ketamine or phencyclidine;
        • Patients judged by study investigator to be at high risk for suicide;
        • Current use of psychotropics other than SSRIs or benzodiazepines as needed.

Contact:
For more information please contact Clinical Research Coordinator David Rosenthal at (212) 659-8803 or david.rosenthal@mssm.edu

Location:
New York, NY

Posted: June 4, 2014


Developing Effective Response Inhibition Training for Symptom Relief in OCD and Trichotillomania

We are currently testing computer-based treatment programs designed to help adults (aged 18-60) suffering from problematic repetitive behaviors, including

        • Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD)
        • Compulsive hair pulling (Trichotillomania)

This research is conducted at the Psychology Training Clinic, the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee (sponsored by the NIMH). All study procedures will be completed in our clinic located within the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee campus. Participants will be randomly assigned to one of the two similar computer-based training conditions designed to help improve symptoms for individuals with OCD or Trichotillomania. As the first step of the study, we will conduct a pre-screening assessment to determine whether the person is eligible for the study. Our computer-based treatment program is provided to eligible participants, and each participant will receive compensation for completing the study.

If you are interested in our study, please contact us at (414) 416-4249, or adl@uwm.edu for more details about the study.


Intimate Relationships and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

Do you or your partner have OCD?

Do you feel you or your partner’s quality of life is significantly impacted by OCD?

Would you like to engage in treatment that may help you to better cope as a couple?

Researchers at York University and Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre in Toronto, Canada are currently seeking individuals with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and their partners to participate in a treatment study.

If you and your partner are between 18 and 65 years of age, are FLUENT in English, and either you or your partner suffer from Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder you may be eligible.

The purpose of this research is to better understand the nature of OCD in committed relationships, while also investigating a couple’s therapy which is designed to help you and your partner cope with OCD and related issues.

You can receive 7 weeks of free treatment, and help others through your participation.

TO LEARN MORE CONTACT US AT:

416-504-6957 or rsiegal@yorku.ca


Adults and Children Help Increase our Understanding of Genetics and OCD

Research has shown that genes can make some people more likely than others to develop Obsessive Compulsive Disorder and related disorders (OCDR). Researchers at the Keck School of Medicine of University of Southern California are trying to find these genes. Once these genes are identified, new and improved treatments may be possible. OCD is characterized by obsessions (unwanted thoughts, images and impulses) that “pop” into a person’s mind. These can generate anxiety and lead to compulsions, or actions aimed to reduce the distress generated by the obsessions You may be eligible to take part in this study if you:

        • Are at least 7 years old; and
        • Have symptoms or a diagnosis of OCDR

If eligible, you will be asked to participate in an interview and to give a small blood sample. If you are unable to donate blood, a saliva sample may be acceptable. The study does not involve the use of any medications, devices or treatment. Participation is not limited to California. You will be compensated for your participation. Please view our website at keck.usc.edu/gpc-ocd or contact us at cgp@usc.edu or 323.863.3995 All inquiries are confidential.

Research funded by the National Institute of Mental Health. Approved under USC HSC-IRB protocol 10-00299.

Posted: May 30, 2014


Effects of Elaboration of Disastrous Consequences verses Cognitive Restructuring on Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Treatment Outcome

OCD CONTAMINATION TREATMENT STUDY

Do your obsessions and compulsions focus on germs or dirt?

The Bio Behavioral Institute in Great Neck, NY is currently conducting a study comparing variations of exposure and response prevention therapy for individuals with contamination OCD.

Currently, the study is open to individuals who:

          1. are 18 years of age or older.
          2. suffer with primarily contamination-related obsessions and compulsions (i.e., the symptoms focus primarily on dirt or germs)
          3. have not experienced any changes in medication in the past 3 months.
          4. are not currently involved in any other treatment (i.e., ERP, supportive, psychodynamic, etc.) Or are willing to temporarily suspend current treatment for the duration of the study (8 weeks).

If interested, please contact Jennifer Wilson at (516) 487-7116.

Posted: May 28, 2014


Comparison of Peer Facilitated Support Group and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Hoarding Disorder

Researchers at the University of California San Francisco and the Mental Health Association of San Francisco are conducting a study to learn more about different treatments for people with problematic hoarding and cluttering or Hoarding Disorder.

Participants of this study will be asked to commit to 16 group sessions, 2 hours in length, over the span of 20 weeks. Before and after receiving the 20-week treatment, participants will complete surveys, diagnostic interviews, and cognitive assessment at the Parnassus campus of UCSF. Payment for participation is $100.

You may be eligible to participate in this study if you are 18 years or older, you have problematic hoarding or cluttering or Hoarding Disorder, and have not received cognitive-behavioral treatment for this problem in the last 12 months.

If you would like to learn more about this study, please contact: Ofilio Vigil at (415) 476-7732 or ofilio.vigil@ucsf.edu

Posted: March 17, 2014


OCD-TRAC Research Program: The Next Step Towards Improving Treatment Outcomes for Pediatric OCD

Has your child or adolescent been diagnosed with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD)? The Division of Medical Psychology is a leading treatment center for pediatric OCD and one of only three sites approved as a training center for OCD treatment. We offer weekly or daily treatment for pediatric OCD and have some of the best response rates in the nation (85% receive 50% reduction in OCD severity), despite generally seeing patients who have failed to respond to treatment at other centers. If your child receives treatment at our clinic they may be eligible to participate in our research program which is investigating innovative methods to improve treatment outcome for pediatric OCD, including cognitive, family, personality, biological and treatment delivery factors.

To be eligible, your child must be under 18 years old and willing to participate in the study. Participation in the study will allow the clinician to do a complimentary diagnostic assessment of the child’s sleeping behaviors and the child will also receive a free follow-up contact 3 months following treatment. Participants will receive financial compensation for their time.

If interested, please call Dr. Joseph McNamara at (352) 392-3611 or email jpm2@ufl.edu.

Updated: August 26, 2015


DO YOU HAVE OBSSESSIVE COMPULSIVE DISORDER? Are you currently taking medications but are still struggling to stop OCD symptoms?

We are currently seeking volunteers for a 12-week research study using an experimental Deep Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for OCD. The study involves 33 study visits. Participants will be reimbursed for time and travel. You must be 22-68. If interested, please contact a study staff at (773) 702-9066, University of Chicago Medical Center. Dr. Jon Grant is directing this study at the University of Chicago.

Posted: June 25, 2015


The Sertraline Pediatric Registry for The Evaluation of Safety (SPRITES)

Has your child received a new prescription of sertraline or recently started psychotherapy to treat their psychiatric condition?

If you answered YES to this question, your child may be eligible to participate in a long-term research study to learn about how sertraline or psychotherapy affect aspects of the cognitive, emotional, and physical development in children/adolescents ages 6 to 16.

For qualified participants, the SPRITES study will include 8 study visits over the course of 3 years. Each study visit will take approximately 30 minutes to complete, however the first study visit may take longer (e.g., 45 to 60 minutes). Based on their clinical judgment, the study doctor will decide if your child will receive a new sertraline prescription or start psychotherapy to treat their psychiatric condition. This may mean that if your child is currently taking another medication for their psychiatric condition, the study doctor may adjust the medication dose, or discontinue the medication entirely, if necessary, without affecting your child’s participation in the SPRITES study.

During the study period, patients must agree to follow all the study requirements, including keeping all study visit appointments, and following the directions of their study doctor. Patients/ parents will receive compensation for their transportation/ time for SPRITES study visits. The study is also seeking interested study centers to participate in the study. If you are a mental health care provider who treats pediatric patients that are currently treated with or could benefit from treatment with sertraline, contact us for more information.

FOR MORE INFORMATION about the SPRITES study, PLEASE CONTACT:

Jennifer Murphy at Jennifer.murphy@duke.edu or (919) 668-8795.

Or visit the clinicaltrials.gov posting for this study: http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01302080

Posted: May 28, 2014


Intimacy in the Obsessive-Compulsive Spectrum

If you are an adult with OCD, Trichotillomania (i.e., hair pulling), or Compulsive Skin Picking, you are invited to participate in a brief online survey. With the information gathered from this survey, we hope to understand concerns related to intimacy with individuals presenting with these conditions. While there is no direct benefit to participants, the study hopes to better understand intimacy and whether it should be addressed in treatment for OCD, Trichotillomania, and Compulsive Skin Picking. The survey will take approximately 30 minutes to 1 hour to complete. All information provided will be kept completely anonymous.

If you have any questions, please contact Dr. Chad Wetterneck at wetterneck@uhcl.edu or 281-283-3364.

You can access the survey at the following link: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/ocspectrumintimacy


Brain Imaging Studies of OCD at Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Do you have obsessive-compulsive disorder?

If so, you might be eligible for a research study looking at cognition at The Mount Sinai Medical Center. You must be between the ages of 18 and 50 and in good physical health. We will ask you to come in for 2-3 separate appointments for a total time commitment of approximately 2 to 6 hours. You will be reimbursed for your participation at the rate of 25 dollars per hour. You will receive no direct benefit for your participation in this study.

During this experiment you will be asked to complete some computer tasks. You maybe asked to do this while sitting in an office, or while having your brain activity measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We may also ask to record some physiological changes in your body while you complete the task.

For more information, call the Mount Sinai Psychiatric Neuroscience and Cognition Laboratory at (212) 241-2857 or email us at SinaiBrainLab@mssm.edu. Please do not disclose any personal or sensitive information via email.


Novel Antibiotic Treatment Study for Children, Adolescents and Young Adults with OCD – Columbia University Medical Center / New York State Psychiatric Institute

This study aims to determine whether adding an FDA-approved antibiotic medication called minocycline to antidepressant treatment can help reduce symptoms of pediatric OCD. This study also aims to learn more about the brains of children and adolescents with OCD.

Your child must be taking a stable dose of a serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SRI) in order to participate in this study. SRI medications typically used to treat OCD include Fluoxetine (Prozac), Fluvoxamine (Luvox), Sertraline (Zoloft), Paroxetine (Paxil), Citalopram (Celexa), Escitalopram (Lexapro) and Clomipramine (Anafranil). During the 12-week study period, your child will continue to take the SRI s/he is currently taking.

This study consists of two phases:

Phase 1

          • A screening period of 1-2 visits to determine if your child is eligible, including a free, thorough psychiatric evaluation.
          • 12 weeks of medication treatment with minocycline or placebo* (pills with no medication in them) at no cost.
          • 7 visits with the study doctor: one hour visit at the start, followed by 30 minute visits every 2 weeks.
          • 2 brain scans in a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) machine.

*There is a two out of three chance that your child will receive minocycline instead of placebo in phase 1.

Phase 2

Medication management and/or Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) for OCD for three months at no cost:

          • Minocycline offered to participants who received placebo in Phase 1.
          • OCD-specific CBT treatment by experts, including Exposure and Response Prevention (ERP) therapy if appropriate.
          • Additional medication care by psychiatrists specializing in OCD treatment.

Individuals will be compensated up to $350 for their participation in the research program. Onsite school services through PS186X at the Children’s Day Unit are provided for all eligible participants.

Organization:

Columbia University Medical Center/New York State Psychiatric Institute

Principal Investigators:

Moira Rynn, M.D. and Helen Blair Simpson, M.D., Ph.D.

Eligibility Criteria:

          • Age: 8 – 20 years
          • Genders: both
          • Key inclusion criteria: Primary diagnosis of OCD and currently on a stable and adequate dose of an SRI

Exclusion Criteria:

Exclusion criteria include, but are not restricted to the following:

          • Lifetime diagnosis of psychotic disorder, bipolar disorder, eating disorder, pervasive developmental disorder, mental retardation, substance/alcohol dependence or pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcus (PANDAS)
          • Current diagnosis of major depressive disorder, tourette’s/tic disorder, or substance/alcohol abuse
          • Active suicidal ideation
          • Hoarding as the primary OCD symptom
          • Pregnant, nursing, or planning to become pregnant

Contact:

For more information please contact Project Manager Prerna Martin at (646) 774-5793.

Location:

New York, NY

State:

New York

Website:

http://columbiapsychiatry.org/pamrc/OCD

For more information on the Columbia University Pediatric Anxiety and Mood Research Clinic (PAMRC), please click here.

For more information on our OCD Treatment & Research Program, please click here.


Attaining and Maintaining Wellness in OCD

1. Are you taking one of the following medications for obsessive- compulsive disorder?

  • Clomipramine (Anafranil)
  • Fluoxetine (Prozac)
  • Fluvoxamine (Luvox)
  • Sertraline (Zoloft)
  • Paroxetine (Paxil)
  • Citalopram (Celexa)
  • Escitalopram (Lexapro)

2. Are you still having bothersome symptoms?
3. Are you interested in receiving no-cost psychotherapy that can improve your OCD symptoms?
4. Are you interested in learning if you still need medication after significant improvement with EX/RP therapy?

If you answered “yes” to all four questions, you may be eligible for treatment as part of a research program at Columbia University and the University of Pennsylvania.

The Center for OCD and Related Disorders at the New York State Psychiatric Institute at Columbia University and the Center for the Treatment and Study of Anxiety at the University of Pennsylvania are offering treatment as part of a research study for people who have obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and are currently taking one of the above medications for their OCD but still have unwanted symptoms.

Eligible participants initially remain on a stable dose of their OCD medication and will receive cognitive behavioral therapy consisting of Exposure and Ritual Prevention (EX/RP) twice a week for up to 12 weeks as additional treatment. Participants who become well (with only minimal to mild OCD symptoms) after the EX/RP will be randomly assigned (assigned by chance) to either continue their medication or begin to taper off their medication and have it gradually replaced with a placebo (sugar pill). All patients will be carefully monitored throughout the study for 24 weeks. The goal of the study is to understand whether patients with OCD on Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SRIs) who achieve wellness from EX/RP can safely discontinue their medication.

No one who has not become well after 12 weeks of EX/RP will discontinue their medication. Individuals who do not improve significantly will be referred elsewhere to receive appropriate clinical treatment.

This study, funded by the National Institute of Mental Health, is a collaboration between Dr. Blair Simpson from Columbia University-New York State Psychiatric Institute and Dr. Edna Foa from the University of Pennsylvania. Men and women ages 18-75 with OCD who are currently taking an SRI medication (Prozac, Zoloft, Paxil, Luvox, Celexa, Lexapro or Anafranil) and who are not taking other psychotropic medications at the same time may be eligible to participate in this study. There is no cost for the cognitive-behavioral therapy.

For more information about the study visit our website at www.ocdtreatmentstudy.com. To talk to someone about participation at the New York site, please contact Stephanie Chen at the Center for OCD and Related Disorders at the New York State Psychiatric Institute at Columbia University in New York at  (646) 774-8062. For information about participation at the Philadelphia site, please contact Natalie Gay at the Center for the Treatment and Study of Anxiety at the University of Pennsylvania at (215) 746-3338.

Updated: August 24, 2015


Mount Sinai OCD Research Study

Are you bothered by recurrent and disturbing thoughts (obsessions) or irresistible urges to check or repeat things (compulsions)?

Examples of obsessions are concerns with contamination, intrusive images or fear of terrible things happening.

Examples of compulsions are checking for safety, excessive washing, or time-consuming rituals.

The Mount Sinai School of Medicine’s Department of Psychiatry is recruiting participants for a new investigational medication research study. The study Is for Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) and eligible participants will receive study related procedures and study medication at no charge.

To qualify for the study, you must:

          • Be between the ages of 18 and 65
          • Currently be taking medication for OCD
          • Continue to have symptoms of OCD while on medication

For more information, please contact:

Resham Gellatly at (212) 659-1677 or resham.gellatly@mssm.edu.

Mount Sinai School of Medicine – 1240 Park Avenue – New York, NY 10029 – 212-659-1600


Yale OCD Research Clinic MRS Imaging Study – Biomarkers of OCD Subtypes using Brain Imaging

Principal Investigator: Christopher Pittenger, M.D., Ph.D.

Yale OCD Research Clinic

New Haven, CT

BACKGROUND:

A number of studies using different techniques have suggested that the neurotransmitter glutamate is present at excessive levels in at least some patients with OCD. This idea has motivated our use of glutamate-modulating drugs in OCD that has not responded to standard therapies. However, the details of how glutamate is out of balance in OCD remain unclear. Likewise, it is unclear whether glutamate dysregulation contributes to all forms of OCD or only to some subtypes. Better understanding this issue may, in the future, help us select which therapies are most likely to work for individual patients.

The Yale OCD Research Clinic uses an imaging method, magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), to measure the levels of glutamate and related molecules in the brain. This is done in a brain scanner very similar to that used for the MRI imaging that is standard in all hospitals. By better understanding how and where glutamate is disrupted in OCD, we hope to expand our knowledge of the biological changes that contribute to the disorder and how to develop new medication strategies to address them.

PARTICIPATION:

This study involves answering questions about your psychiatric condition and then having a single MRS scan. An MRS scan is very similar to an MRI scan, which is done routinely in clinical care; it requires you to lie still in a large scanner for about 90 minutes. Both OCD patients who are on no medications and those who are on medications and are entering one of our treatment studies are eligible for this study. (Yale HIC #: 0803003626)

FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT:

Suzanne Wasylink, RN-BC
Nurse Manager
Yale OCD Research Clinic
Local: (203) 974-7523
Toll-Free: 1-855-OCD-YALE

Or visit the participation section of our website:

http://www.ocd.yale.edu/participate/participate.aspx

Updated: September 2, 2015


Do you suffer from OCD?

Do you:

  • Worry a lot about germs or contracting a serious disease?
  • Have a strong need for symmetry or exactness?
  • Constantly doubt the accuracy of things you do?
  • Describe yourself as a superstitious person?

Are you spending large amounts of time:

  • Cleaning/Washing your home or workplace?
  • Doing things several times or until it feels right?
  • Counting objects like stairs, floor or ceiling tiles?
  • Repeatedly checking locks, light switches and appliances?
  • Arranging/Organizing?

You may be eligible to participate in a research medication study in the treatment of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder. You must be between the ages 18-65.

For more information contact:

Jasmine at 905-921-7644, or email us at jasmine@macanxiety.com

www.macanxiety.com


Are you concerned about your appearance?

Are you between the ages of 18 and 30?

          • Are you concerned about specific features of your appearance that you believe are ugly or unattractive?
          • Are you spending much of your day thinking about your appearance?
          • Are you avoiding mirrors or spending a lot of time looking in the mirror?
          • Is your concern causing a lot of distress and/or interfering with your functioning?

If so, you may have a psychiatric condition called Body dysmorphic disorder, and may be eligible to take part in a study that is providing free:

          • Diagnostic Evaluation
          • Brain scans: functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI)
          • EEG

In addition, you will be paid for your participation.

Study conducted by Jamie Feusner, MD and Michael Strober, PhD

For more information call:

(310) 206-0468

csheen@mednet.ucla.edu

http://www.semel.ucla.edu/bdd/research

Posted: September 7, 2012


N-acetylcysteine for the Treatment of Pediatric Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

The Yale Child Study Center is conducting a study on N-acetylcysteine (a natural supplement)in children with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD). Subjects will receive either active N-acetylcysteine or a placebo for 12 weeks and remain on current medications.

The study is open to children ages 8 to 17 with chronic Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder. Participants will be compensated up to $150 for their participation.

If you have any questions or would like to learn more about the study please visit our website or contact Jilian Mulqueen at (203)-737-4809 or jilian.mulqueen@yale.edu

HIC#1004006623

Posted: August 21, 2012


Group Therapy Imagining Study for Pediatric OCD

Do you have a child with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD)?Children with OCD (ages 8-20) and their parents are needed for a research study using functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to understand how cognitive behavior therapy helps patients get better.

Youth with OCD are provided with cognitive behavioral group therapy, delivered by an expert clinician at the University of Michigan over about 12 weeks. Volunteers must be able to come for a 1-5 hour interview (interview may occur over one or two sessions) and a 1 hour fMRI scan with a parent, for a total of 2-5 hours, before and after treatment. Payment is $50.00 for each interview and $50.00 for each scan. Subjects will also be reimbursed for mileage if they live further than 20 miles from the Rachel Upjohn Building.

Contact us at 734-232-0443 or ocdkids05@umich.edu for more information.

Your child may have OCD if he/she experiences:

          1. Persistent, disturbing worries, doubts, or fears
          2. Repetitive urges to wash, organize, check or pray
          3. Uncontrollable, upsetting, or inappropriate thoughts or mental images
          4. Habits or patterns of behavior that interfere with daily life
          5. A tendency to ask repeatedly for reassurance
          6. A need to do things “just right”
          7. Urges to hoard useless objects

Study of Website to Improve Communications Between OCD Patients and Family

Are you either an OCD sufferer, or have an OCD sufferer in your family?

If so, and you are 18 years of age or older, and have access to the internet, you are eligible to participate in an anonymous research study.

The study will require you to spend about 20 minutes interacting with a new website providing information about how to better understand OCD and how to improve family communication about OCD. No information will be recorded that would permit you to be identified.

To participate in this study, use your computer’s browser to go to: www.ocdandfamilies.org

For any questions about this study or the use of the website, email Dr. Lee Baer at lbaer@partners.org


A positron emission tomography study of the serotonin 1B receptor in OCD

Antidepressant medications that target the serotonin system of the brain have long been used in the treatment of OCD and are of significant benefit to approximately 50% of patients. However, whether abnormalities of the serotonin system are a cause of OCD, and how they may contribute, remains quite unclear. Several lines of evidence, from pharmacological studies in patients and from work in mice, suggest that a particular serotonin receptor, the 5HT-1b receptor, may contribute to OCD symptoms.

We are investigating this hypothesis using positron emission tomography (PET), a brain imaging technique that allows visualization of particular neurotransmitter receptors in the brain using very low doses of a radioactive tracer and a special camera. We are examining the receptors both in patients with OCD (on no medications) and in control subjects without OCD, and comparing the two. Subjects who do this imaging study may also perform tests of sensory gating, to test the association between sensory gating and this serotonin receptor.

Participation in this study involves several visits to our clinic. First, subjects will participate in standard screening and clinical and medical assessments, as in most of our studies. They will then have a standard MRI brain scan, which gives a 3-dimensional picture of the brain. The third session is the PET imaging. This is a long session (several hours) that begins quite early in the morning. Finally, subjects may be brought back for a test of sensory gating. Because participation in this study requires multiple visits, some of which are fairly long, the compensation for participants’ time is higher than for our other studies. Anyone interested in more information should contact our nurse manager, Suzanne Wasylink, at (203) 974-7523.


Cerebral glutamate levels in OCD: Pathophysiology and predictors of response

A number of studies using different techniques have suggested that the neurotransmitter glutamate is present at excessive levels in at least some patients with OCD. This idea has motivated our use of glutamate-modulating drugs in OCD that has not responded to standard therapies. However, the details of how glutamate is out of balance in OCD remain unclear. Likewise, it is unclear whether glutamate dysregulation contributes to all forms of OCD or only to some subtypes. Better understanding this issue may, in the future, help us select which therapies are most likely to work for individual patients.

We use an imaging method, magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), that allows us to measure the levels of glutamate and related molecules in the brain. This is done in a brain scanner very similar to that used for the MRI imaging that is standard in all hospitals. By better understanding how and where glutamate is disrupted in OCD, we hope to expand our knowledge of the biological changes that contribute to the disorder and how to develop new medication strategies to address them.

Participation in this study involves answering questions about your psychiatric condition and then having a single MRS scan. An MRS scan is very similar to an MRI scan, which is done routinely in clinical care; it requires you to lie still in a large scanner for about 90 minutes. Some people with claustrophobia find this difficult, as the scanner is rather confined. Both OCD patients who are on no medications and those who are on medications and are entering one of our treatment studies are eligible for this study.

Anyone interested in more information should contact our nurse manager, Suzanne Wasylink, at (203) 974-7523.


Children with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) Needed for Family Assessment Study

Does your child have to do things “just right”? Does he have to keep doing something over and over again? Does she have thoughts that constantly bother her? The Child Anxiety Research (CARe) Program is inviting youths ages 9-17 with OCD and one of their parents to participate in a research study. Those eligible receive a full assessment of symptoms, compensation, and written feedback including potential diagnoses and treatment options and referrals. Please call (330) 672-2200 if interested or if you’re not sure if your child has OCD.

**Not all families will qualify. Duration of participation for these families will not exceed 2 hours.

This posting has been approved by the Kent State University Institutional Review Board.

www.childanxietyresearchprogram.com

Updated: June 22, 2015


Children with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) Needed for Treatment Study

Does your child have to do things “just right”? Does he have to keep doing something over and over again? Does she have thoughts that constantly bother her? The Child Anxiety Research (CARe) Program offers assessment and treatment services to children and adolescents ages 4-17 with OCD. Families meeting eligibility requirements may receive a full assessment of symptoms, treatment recommendations, and, if eligible, treatment at the CARe Program. Please call 330-672-2200 if interested or if you’re not sure if your child has OCD.

**Not all families will qualify. Duration of participation for these families will not exceed 2 hours.

This posting has been approved by the Kent State University Institutional Review Board.

www.childanxietyresearchprogram.com


Treatment of Late Life Compulsive Hoarding

This study will examine a new behavioral treatment for older adults with compulsive hoarding.

What is involved?

Participants will be randomized to a new behavioral treatment for compulsive hoarding or case management. There are no fees or costs associated with participation. This is a non-medication study.

Who is eligible?

To participate, you must be over the age of 60 and live in San Diego, California.

Who do I contact?

Please call Catherine Ayers, Ph.D., ABPP at 858-552-8585 extension 2976 for more information.

VA Career Development Award: Treatment of Late Life Compulsive Hoarding (Ayers PI; CSRD-068-10S)


Reactions to Hoarding

Principal Investigators: Martin M. Antony, PhD, CPsych, & Valerie Vorstenbosch, MA

Email: hoardingstudy@psych.ryerson.ca

Do you or a loved one have difficulties throwing things away? Researchers in the Department of Psychology at Ryerson University are seeking individuals to participate in a hoarding research project. The purpose of the project is to investigate loved ones’ reactions to hoarding-related behaviors (acquiring, difficulty discarding, clutter)

A brief online screening questionnaire (which participants will not receive compensation for) is required to determine eligibility. If you and your loved one are eligible to participate, you will both be asked to complete a series of online questionnaires and a telephone interview. You will be compensated for your participation, if eligible.

For more information about the study, please visit www.hoardingstudy.ca. If you are interested in participating in this study, please email Valerie Vorstenbosch at hoardingstudy@psych.ryerson.ca.


Study of Web-based Treatment for OCD

Do you have obsessive-compulsive disorder or think you might? Have you had trouble finding treatment for your OCD? Do you use the Internet? If you answered “yes” to these questions, you might be eligible to participate in a research study conducted by Dr. Kenneth Kobak of the Center for Psychological Consultation.

This study will evaluate a new, web-based treatment program for obsessive-compulsive disorder called BT Steps. BT Steps teaches participants skills from cognitive behavior therapy and is based on an earlier, telephone-based program that was shown to be effective in a research trial. In the current research study, we will assess the effectiveness of BT Steps alone, or supported by coaching from either a trained coach or a cognitive behavior therapist. This study is supported by a grant from the National Institute of Mental Health.

To participate in this study, you must be at least 18 years old, have OCD, and use or be willing to use the Internet. Participants will be compensated up to $150 for their participation.

If you have any questions or would like to learn more about this study please contact Revere Greist at (608) 556-0766 or rgreist@centerforpsychconsulting.com.

Posted: January 6, 2012


Enhancing the Effectiveness of Behavior Therapy for Body Dysmorphic Disorder

PI: Sabine, Wilhelm, PhD
1-877-4MGH-BDD
bdd@partners.org

In this study we seek to investigate the effectiveness of D-cycloserine as a memory enhancer for Exposure and Response Prevention in the treatment of Body Dysmorphic Disorder. D-cycloserine is an antibiotic that has been used in the treatment of tuberculosis for over 20 years. Research so far demonstrates D-cycloserine does increase the effectiveness of Exposure and Response Prevention in the treatment of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder. We would like to expand this research with D-cycloserine to see if it is effective with body dysmorphic disorder.

For further information about enrolling a patient in this trial, please contact:
877-4MGH-BDD
bdd@partners.org

Updated: November 3, 2016


Anonymous Online Survey on Body Movements in Adults with and without OCD

If you are an adult with or without OCD, you are invited to participate in a brief online survey. With the information gathered from this survey, we hope to estimate the prevalence of and begin to understand the function of subtle movements among individuals with OCD. The survey will take approximately 15-20 minutes to complete. While there are no direct benefits for completing the survey, $1 will be donated to the International OCD Foundation for each participant. All information provided will be kept completely anonymous. If you have any questions, please contact Dr. Marilyn Cugnetto at the NeuroBehavioral Institute at 954-217-1757.You can access the survey at the following link: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/nbi1

Posted: September 1, 2011


Brain Imaging Research Study (# 6218) Seeks Adolescent Participants with OCD

Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York

Please note that this is an opportunity to participate in research for compensation and not a job posting.

We are looking for adolescents age 12-17 with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) to participate in a research study.

This study is investigating the brain of people with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) compared to healthy volunteers for research purposes. The study uses two brain imaging procedures called Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). You will undergo one scan, which lasts for approximately 75 minutes and takes images (pictures) of your brain. There is no radiation exposure risk from the scan. The images are not used for clinical or diagnostic purposes. All information will be kept completely confidential.

BENEFITS AND RISKS OF PARTICIPATING:

Participants are compensated $175 for their time. Please call us to discuss in more detail the benefits and risks of participating.

WHO CAN PARTICIPATE:

          • Participants between the ages of 12 and 17 who have OCD as their primary problem and are not currently on any psychiatric medications, or are on a stable dose of medication, may be eligible.
          • Participants must be able to travel to the New York State Psychiatric Institute/Columbia University at 1051 Riverside Drive (at 168 Street) in Manhattan and must not be pregnant.

PROCEDURES:

          1. Screening by phone.
          2. If potentially eligible, a psychiatric and medical evaluation and clinical assessments to confirm eligibility (time estimate of 2-3 hours).
          3. If eligible, a MRI/MRS scan (time estimate of 75 minutes)

This is not a part-time job. Compensation is being provided for participation in a research study.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT:

Children’s Day Unit, Columbia University

(212) 543-0266

          • Location: Columbia University Medical Center, NY
          • Compensation: $175 for completion of study and offered two months of free treatment as needed.
          • Phone calls about this are ok.
          • Please do not contact job poster about other services, products, or commercial interests.

UCLA Research Opportunity for Kids and Teens with OCD

We are studying non-drug Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) and the brain in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

This UCLA Research Study, conducted by John Piacentini, Ph.D. and Joseph O’Neill, Ph.D., is investigating brain correlates of OCD. We are seeking help from children 8-17 with OCD to participate in this study. Participation involves MRI scans, EEG recordings, and 12 sessions of nonmedication Cognitive Behavioral Therapy.

Please call (310) 206-1350 for more information.


UCLA Research Study for Adults and Children with OCD

This UCLA Research Study, conducted by James McCracken, M.D., is investigating genetic factors that may increase the risk for OCD. We are seeking help from individuals with OCD (adults and children 8 years-old and up) and their parents to participate in this study. Participation involves an interview and blood draws and you will be compensated $145 for participants’ time.

Please call (310) 206-1350 for more information


UCLA Research Study for Kids & Teens with OCD

We Are Studying Computer Based Attention Training Treatment for Kids with OCD

This UCLA Research Study conducted by Dr. Susanna Chang is investigating the usefulness of a novel computer-based attention training treatment for childhood OCD. We are seeking help from children ages 8 – 17 with OCD as study participants. Participation involves EEG recordings and 5 weeks of a non-medication attention training treatment.

Call (310) 825-2064 for more information.

Updated: August 26, 2015


Imaging Genetics Study of Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

We are conducting a research study to identify biochemical changes and genetic variations associated with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). By combining brain imaging and genetics, the study will provide new information about the causes of OCD that may lead to improvements in its diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. This is a collaborative study being conducted at the University of Michigan, Wayne State University, and Hospital for Sick Children and Centre for Addiction and Mental Health.

Your child must be between the ages of 6-19 and have a diagnosis of OCD. If he/she is eligible to participate in this study, he/she will participate in an assessment interview, a small saliva collection and/or a small blood draw, and an MRI scan. A parent is required to participate. We are, also seeking healthy controls as research participants. Monetary compensation is provided to those who complete the study.

If you are interested or have any questions, please email the project coordinator at ChildAnxiety@umich.edu.

Updated: September 3, 2015


Anxiety Studies Participant Pool

UW Anxiety Studies researchers are currently seeking volunteers for our Anxiety Studies Participant Pool. You may be eligible if you experience any of the following: Recurrent thoughts or images that are unwanted, distasteful, inappropriate, intrusive or distressing, such as:

          • The idea that you were dirty, contaminated or had germs
          • Doubting that you turned appliances off or locked doors properly
          • Fearing that you would act on some impulse
          • Obsessions with sexual thoughts, images, or impulses
          • The need to do something repeatedly without being able to resist doing it, like washing, cleaning, checking or counting
          • The need to do things in a certain way even if another way would be more efficient
          • The need to keep things you don’t need

Diagnosis of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Participants who are eligible for the Pool (as determined by a 15-minute confidential phone interview) will be asked to complete:

          • An in-person interview about symptoms of anxiety, depression, drug/alcohol use, unusual experiences and physical sensations (30-60 minutes)
          • Self-report questionnaires about symptoms, mood, social experiences, thoughts about self, concentration and habits (45-60 minutes)

Participants will receive $40.00 in appreciation of their time.

Confidential inquiries can be made through the Anxiety Studies Division:

http://anxietystudies.uwaterloo.ca

519-888-4567, x35920

anxiety@uwaterloo.ca


Investigating How OCD Works in the Brain (IRB# 6159)

Would you be interested in helping us learn more about how OCD works in the brain? The OCD Research Clinic at the Columbia University Medical Center is conducting studies using techniques such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), measurement of the startle response, and manual and computer-based tests to learn more about the neurobiology of OCD. If you are over 18 and have OCD, you might be eligible for one or more of our current studies. For each study you choose to participate in, you will be compensated for your time. To schedule a confidential screening, contact: Jose Hernandez (646) 774-7000, or visit our website at http://www.columbia-ocd.org.

Updated: September 3, 2015


Perceptual Differences in Individuals with Body Dysmorphic Disorder and OCD

Research by Fugen Neziroglu, PhD and Deniz Sidali, MA

What is the purpose of the study? The main purpose of this study is to further assess how various psychiatric disorders may affect individuals’ perception. The primary goal of this research is to examine and compare the visual perceptions of individuals with BDD or Body Dysmorphic Disorder and (OCD) obsessive compulsive disorder to individuals without a psychiatric disorder.

What will I be asked to do?
1. You will be asked to complete a set of questionnaires.
2. You will be asked to take a test on the computer.

Who can take part in this study? We are looking for adults (aged 18+) who experience or have experienced symptoms of body dysmorphic disorder or obsessive compulsive disorder.

How long will it take? In total, we would expect the research to take between 2 and 4 hours although there is no time limit.

Does this study have ethical approval? The study has full ethical approval from Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York and the BioBehavioral Institute in Great Neck, New York. It is unlikely that the questionnaires or computer program will cause distress for the participants.

Is my information kept confidential? Yes! All the information that we get from this study will be confidential, anonymous and will only be used for research purposes. All computer generated results and materials will be stored electronically on a secure server at the BioBehavioral Institute that will be password protected and only accessible to the research team.

How do I take part in this research? To take part in this study, simply call the BioBehavioral Institute at (516) 487-7116.

Who can I contact if I have any questions? Any questions about the research can be directed to Deniz Sidali, MA, who is the researcher, at (516) 487-7116.

Participants will be compensated $20 dollars and receive psychological testing typically worth thousands of dollars for free if they qualify. Individuals with BDD will receive 3 free sessions with a therapist upon completion of the study.

Updated: June 23, 2015


Study Exploring Nutritionally-Based Interventions for Non-Medicated Children with OCD

We are conducting a research study exploring the use of omega-3 fatty acids and/or B vitamins in children who have obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). This is exciting research that may lead to a better understanding of nutritionally-based interventions for children who are affected by OCD. Your participation is greatly appreciated!

Participation criteria includes the following:

          • Children between the ages of 6 and 17 years old
          • Primary diagnosis of OCD
          • Not currently, or within the past three months, on an SSRI or other medication for OCD
          • Not currently, or within the past three months, taking complementary or alternative substances for OCD, such as inositol, omega-3 fatty acids, fish oil, 5-HTP, Valerian root, B vitamins, etc.
          • Willingness to remain medication-free for the duration of the study (1-2 months)
          • Willingness to not start, change, or discontinue current form of therapy
          • Ability to swallow large 1″ capsules

Exclusions:

          • Known allergies to fish or shellfish
          • Individuals on blood thinning medication

If your child meets the eligibility criteria and is interested in participating in this research, please notify Lisa M. Bordeleau, Principal Investigator, at n3ocdresearch@aol.com. Also, feel free to contact Ms. Bordeleau if you have any questions about the study.

Posted: October 2, 2008


Neurobiology Of Hoarding Disorders

The UCSD Obsessive Compulsive Disorders Program is looking for people with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) and Hoarding Disorder to take part in a study that is providing:

  • Brain imaging, which is a way of taking pictures of brain structure and function through techniques called positron emission tomography (PET) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI).
  • 12 weeks of free treatment with an FDA approved medication (no placebos).
  • Neuropsychological testing, which includes testing of your attention, memory, thinking, and decision-making, before and after treatment.

To participate, you must either live in or near San Diego, or be able to travel easily to our center for all procedures and treatment appointments. Participants must meet the inclusion criteria for this study.

Individuals will be excluded from participation if they:

  • Are currently taking medications that affect brain function, such as antidepressants, anti-anxiety drugs, antipsychotics, etc.
  • Have bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), panic disorder, autism, mental retardation, or an eating disorder.
  • Have a neurological disorder, such as epilepsy, Parkinson’s disease, stroke, traumatic brain injury, or dementia.
  • Have a history of chronic alcohol or substance use.
  • Weigh over 280 pounds.

There is NO monetary compensation for this study. If interested, visit our website at www.psychiatry.ucsd.edu/research/obsessive-compulsive-disorders-program/Pages/default.aspx please contact Dr. Jennifer Sumner at (858) 246-1872 or ucsdocdresearch@gmail.com.

Updated: September 18, 2015


Does Your Teenager Have An Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD)?

Signs of obsessive compulsive disorder include:

          • Having unwanted ideas, impulses or images that run through their mind over and over again that could make them feel nervous and afraid.
          • Doing certain behaviours over and over again to get rid of the fear or thoughts that are making him or her uncomfortable.

We all have habits and routines in our daily lives. However, people with OCD have patterns or routines that significantly get in the way of their daily lives.

If your child’s day to day life is affected by these symptoms, OCD may be the cause. New York State Psychiatric Institute/Columbia University is looking for research volunteers (age of 12 to 17) to help find possible treatments for adolescents suffering from OCD. Your child may be eligible for a research study, which may include a clinical evaluation, medical tests, physical exam and research medication. These services are provided at no cost to you.

For more information, please call Moira Rynn, M.D. at (212) 543-4506.

Posted: September 18, 2007


Study of Perception in BDD and OCD

Dr. Fugen Neziroglu and Dr. Yaryura-Tobias at the Bio-Behavioral Institute in Great Neck, NY are studying differences in perception between people with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, Body Dysmorphic Disorder, and healthy controls, especially with regard to appearance related perception. Greater understanding of perception in these populations could aid in designing therapies that better target the factors that contribute to the disorders. Participation is open to anyone with OCD or BDD, or without any psychiatric diagnosis. Participants need to allow us to photograph them. Participants receive feedback as well as compensation .

Information: The Bio-Behavioral Institute is located in Great Neck on Long Island, NY.

For more information or to sign up, call and speak with Natalie or Jonathan at (516) 487-7116. Information is also available on our website: http://www.biobehavioralinstitute.com.

Posted: May 25, 2007


Probiotic Research Study — MacAnxiety Research Centre

Do you:

  • Describe yourself as a superstitious person?
  • Constantly doubt the accuracy of things you do?
  • Worry about germs or contracting a serious disease?
  • Have a strong need for symmetry or exactness?

Are you spending large amounts of time:

  • With songs or music stuck in your head that you don’t want there?
  • Doing things several times or until it feels right?
  • Counting objects like stairs, floor or ceiling tiles?
  • Repeatedly checking locks, light switches and appliances?
  • Arranging/Organizing?
  • Cleaning/Washing your home or workplace?

The MacAnxiety Research Centre is conducting a study investigating the effectiveness of a natural health product for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD).

You must be 18 to 65 years old and in good health.

For more information, please respond to this ad or contact (905) 921-7644; turnaj@mcmaster.ca. For additional information visit www.macanxiety.com.

Posted: November 30, 2015


Validation of Stimuli Set for Study of Attentional Bias in Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

Individuals with Obsessive Compulsive Symptoms
Queen’s University Belfast is inviting you to take part in an online research study which aims at creating a valid picture and word set to be used in research on how individuals with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) pay attention to objects or scenes that relate to their symptoms. The leading theory in OCD suggests that this process is a key factor in maintaining and exacerbating the symptoms of people with OCD. The current project will hopefully help in developing new future treatments for this mental health difficulty.

What will I have to do if I do want to take part?
This study is all online and consists of three online surveys that can be carried out at your leisure. The surveys ask you to answer some questions on yourself and to rate a series of images and words on how unpleasant, anxiety-provoking, upsetting and attention grabbing they are. Each survey takes around 30-40 minutes to complete, you are free to take breaks when you feel you need them at any time during the survey. All three surveys do not need to be completed in one day but we do ask that they are completed within two weeks of finishing the first one. Some of the images and words used in the study may mildly distressing for you. However, there is nothing included in the study that you would not experience on T.V. or everyday life. You are free to stop the study at any time by exiting the window without giving a reason. For further information please feel free to email the lead researcher Rachel Johnston on rjohnston65@qub.ac.uk who will be happy to answer any questions you may have.

Please follow the links below if you would like to take part in the study.

Survey 1: http://qubpsych.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_3yogOFtOnRdTsbj
Survey 2: http://qubpsych.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_3Rb6fpX78wLHvs9
Survey 3: http://qubpsych.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_9ERjE16T8nl8VV3

Clinical Psychologists
Clinical Psychologists are also invited to take part in this study. The study is still the same as the one above with the addition of a few questions, based on your clinical experience treating Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, as to how the images would provoke obsessions and compulsions.
Please follow the links below if you would like to take part in the study.

Survey 1: http://qubpsych.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_eDS85dFW8fOHwZT
Survey 2: http://qubpsych.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_3wSzMv47Qx6Rz7f
Survey 3: http://qubpsych.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_dm03JrKbF5BM9yl

Thank you very much for taking the time to read this advertisement.


Parental Experiences and Perspectives of Pediatric OCD

The purpose of this study is to learn more about the experience of parenting a child or adolescent diagnosed with OCD. If you are a parent of a child between the ages of 5 and 17 who has been diagnosed with OCD, are English-speaking, and have access to a telephone, you may be eligible to participate. There are no direct benefits to you for participating in this study, but it is an opportunity to provide information that may help to better support other parents and families dealing with pediatric OCD. This research is being conducted as part of a dissertation project at the School of Social Service Administration, The University of Chicago.

Please contact Megan Schwallie, Ph.D. Candidate at nordquml@uchicago.edu or (312) 479-5860 if you would like to learn more.

Posted: December 11, 2015


Research Study Posting Policy

          1. To post a research study recruitment advertisement on this webpage and/or in the quarterly OCD Newsletter, please email a copy of the most recent IRB study approval, including approval for advertising/recruitment, to Tiia Groden at tgroden@iocdf.org. Note: In order for the study to be posted in the OCD Newsletter in addition to the website, the IRB approval must cover both online and printed material.
          2. We ask that either the Principle Investigator (PI) or someone involved in the research study be either a Professional or a Student/Trainee Member with the IOCDF.* For more information on membership, click here.
          3. Once IRB approval is received and verified, please e-mail the advertisement text exactly as it is to appear in the Newsletter and/or on the website to Tiia Groden at tgroden@iocdf.org. Please indicate if you wish the study to be posted only on the website or in the newsletter as well.
          4. Research studies will be added to a queue for listing in the Newsletter on a first-come, first served basis.
          5. Studies will be listed in one edition of the Newsletter free of charge. If repeat listings in subsequent issues are desired, a fee of $50 per edition will be applied.
          6. In an effort to ensure that our website contains only active, current research listings, research studies will be posted on the website for a term of one year. At the end of the year, studies must be resubmitted (along with IRB approval) to renew the website listing.

If there are any questions or concerns regarding the research participants sought policy, please contact Tiia Groden at (617) 973-5801, Ext 29, or email tgroden@iocdf.org.

*If you are interested in posting a research study and do not wish to become a member with the IOCDF, please contact Tiia Groden directly.